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Showing posts with the label 2nd

Superstar Reading Strategies

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What you might know as " Reciprocal Teaching " (links to Reading Rockets' explanation page), we refer to as Why? Because isn't it every learner's goal to be a ๐ŸŒŸ Superstar Reader ๐ŸŒŸ? Well, even if it's not, it's our goal to make it their goal. If you want to be the best, you learn from the best. These ๐ŸŒŸ Superstar Strategies ๐ŸŒŸ are exactly that: four strategies good readers use while reading.  And we remind our ๐ŸŒŸ Superstar Readers ๐ŸŒŸ of that every time they read.  How We Use Them: At Whole Group shared reading time we model using the strategies. During Small Group instruction we work together to practice the strategies. When reading independently , learners use the strategies on their own . We bet you've seen these strategies before.  The ๐ŸŒŸSuperstar Strategies๐ŸŒŸ are: Predicting Before reading to set the scene and get excited ! During reading to keep them invested in the story and to help them alter initial predictions based on new information. A

A Wolfe Stew Review of Calvin Gets the Last Word

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    While Calvin may get the last word, you’ll get the last laugh. This book brings you to unexpected places in memorable ways. An engaging involvement in word collection woven into a relatable story. After reading, you’re likely to start thinking of the words you use in a different way. As always, I’ll alert you to potential spoilers with asterisks surrounding the header.   Target Audience Leaders of learners looking to excite vocabulary interest and for anyone who is part of a family.  Wolfe Stew believes this book is a great read aloud option for ages 6 to 8 with independent reading encouraged for 8-10 . Calvin Gets the Last Word  (as of May 5, 2021) does not yet have a Lexile or AR Level . The author’s (Margo Sorenson) website lists it suited for ages 4-9 . Amazon lists it as appropriate for grades 2-6 (approximately ages 7-12 ). Leader/Learner Summaries Print these pictures. Then, display the "learner" card on a suggested reading bulleting board a

Intro Video to Mr. Wolfe's Kinder Garden

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The Big Five for 2nd & 3rd Grade

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Greetings Leaders, Welcome to Wolfe Stew!   We are glad you chose to spend National Math Storytelling Day with us!    A day to combine literacy and math - what a fun way to approach math for our learners who are more literary minded. One of my favorite math books is Math Curse by Jon Scieszka.   I read it with my niece in fourth grade.   She shocked me when she used the escape plan from the book as her own in a hypothetical situation imposed upon her by the Mr.   Without hesitation, she responded to the scenario of being locked in a cage with, “Oh, that’s simple.   I’ll take a piece of chalk and break it in two.   A half and half make a whole.   I'm out.”   I died laughing.   The Mr. chuckled too.   I don’t think he was expecting her to stand tall in the face of his scenario of doom.   What math books or math storytelling have you used with your learners?   It is so fun seeing them connect with and live in the world of numbers.   When they begin to discover math ev